Monday, December 03, 2012

Christie's Pop Culture auction nets $1,045,320; Pinocchio painting fetches $69,200

Art Daily News
The top lot of the sale was an original concept painting by Gustaf Tenggren for Walt Disney 
Studios of Pinocchio dating from 1940 which sold for £43,250 / $69,200 / €43,414. 

Caitlin Graham, Junior Specialist, Popular Culture-Film and Entertainment: “Strong results 
were achieved throughout Christie’s POP Culture auction, with passionate bidding seen for 
memorabilia from every decade of film and music history over the last century. The Golden Era 
of Hollywood witnessed the highest prices with two 1940s artworks, one for Disney’s Pinocchio 
and the other a studio portrait of Ava Gardner, selling for £43,250 each. Three iconic props 
originally made for the 1980s Indiana Jones film trilogy generated an exciting bidding war 
between many fans. 
Indy’s bull-whip led the trio, selling to an online bidder in the US for £20,000, the ‘Grail Diary’
 sold to the room for £18,750 and an absentee bid secured the prop chalice ‘Holy Grail’ for
£11,875. Stage costume led the music offering, with Madonna’s instantly recognizable 
Jean Paul Gaultier beaded corset with conical cups selling for  a world record price of £32,450, 
more than doubling the previous record set at Christie’s in 1999.
Mick Jagger’s Ossie Clark jumpsuit sold for £20,000 demonstrating the enduring appeal of 
The Rolling Stones as they celebrate 50 years at the forefront of Rock and Roll.” 

Nicolette Tomkinson, Director and Head of Popular Culture: “The sale attracted interest from fans, collectors and the media alike with the category continuing to appeal to a broad and international audience. Highlighting the increasing 
prominence of online bidding, the auction witnessed a record for our South Kensington saleroom
 with 62% of lots bought or underbid via Christie’s LIVE. This follows yesterday’s record sale in 
New York when Edward Hopper’s October on Cape Cod sold for $9.6 million becoming the most 
expensive item ever sold online by an international auction house.” 

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